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Natural cold and flu remedies
The time to treat a cold is when you don’t have it! Prevention is always better than cure. However the same herbs that keep colds and flu at bay, will also help you get rid of it faster.

The common cold is caused by any one of 200 different viruses. When infection occurs , the walls of the respiratory tract swell and produce excess mucus, giving rise to the typical cold symptoms. Symptoms range from sore throat, running nose, nasal congestion, watery eyes to hacking cough, headache, and fever. Most colds run their course in 7-10 days. Recurrent colds (almost constantly suffering) may indicate a lowered immune capacity and too much stress and often not enough sleep.

Colds spread from person to person and are highly contagious. Coughing, sneezing or hand to hand contact will easily pass the virus on. The virus can also live for several hours on everyday surfaces.

Herbal remedies and the ever popular echinacea
One particular herb has recently had a lot of press coverage and marketing as a ‘new’ cure for colds. Echinacea has in fact been used by America Indians for hundreds of years. It is native to the North America Plains, but varieties of the species are now found on most continents. Echinacea increases levels of properdin, a chemical which activates the part of the immune system responsible for increasing defence mechanisms against virus and bacteria attacks.

Its anti-bacterial effect makes it a good herb for treating many viral and bacterial infections. Echinacea is also an excellent blood cleanser, it helps to sweep dead cells and other debris through the channels of the lymphatic system. And dispatches white blood cells to fight the infection. The best test to determine if you are taking a good, high strength echinacea is the tongue test. After you have taken the tincture, the back of your tongue should feel numb or tingly. This feeling will soon pass, but you know you are using a good quality product. So when you feel the cold coming on – reach for the echinacea tincture. It is important to try to take echinacea before the full onset of a cold or flu to give the best chance of a swift recovery.

Garlic
No treatment of colds would be complete without Garlic. This pungent herb was highly esteemed by the ancient Egyptians, who ensured that the slaves building the Great Pyramids at Cheops were given a daily supply. The Romans also acknowledged garlic’s strengthening powers and fed it to their soldiers before battle. Garlic has anti-bacterial properties that help the immune system to fight infection, it is an excellent boost to the immune system. The reason for this is garlic contains several helpful compounds, including allicin, one of the plant kingdom’s most potent antibiotics. Garlic combines well with echinacea and together make a strong fighting force against infections.

Onion is a close relative of Garlic and has similar properties, containing similar antiviral chemicals. Use onions and leeks in your cooking when you have a cold or are around people who do.

Ginger
Ginger is another of natures’ antiviral herbs. It contains nearly a dozen antiviral compounds. Ginger is pain relieving, antiseptic and antioxidant. It is valuable for preventing and treating colds, sore throats and inflammation of mucus membranes. Ginger reduces pain and fever and has a mild sedative effect that will encourage rest. And it is tasty! (with no lingering odours!) Drink a tea, or soak fresh ginger in hot water, take as a tincture and include it in your food. Ginger is also delicious in a fruit smoothy (a mix of soft chilled fruits put in a blender).

Vitamin C
Vitamin C is very good for the relief of cold symptoms and to help the body fight infection. The best source of vitamins is always fresh fruit and vegetables. Citrus fruit is especially high in vitamin C. Combine orange, pineapple, seedless grapes, lots of fresh ginger, banana, pink grapefruit, cantaloupe in a blender. Add orange juice if more liquid is needed. This not only makes a delicious drink, but is healthy and fights that cold.

Don’t eat junk food when you have a cold or flu
When you have a cold or flu your body is under a lot of stress, fighting the viral infection. Big, heavy meals take vital energy to digest, resources which your body could be using to fight the infections. An old saying states “Feed a cold and starve a fever”. A better saying is “Starve a cold and starve a fever”. The best thing to do is drink plenty of liquids – water, fruit juices and if needed soups, but stay away from heavy and highly processed food. High liquid intake is important as the body uses water to carry waste products and toxins to your elimination systems.

Goldenseal
Goldenseal is both antiseptic and immune stimulating, increasing blood supply to the spleen. The spleen is the bodies staging area for the fighting cells in your immune system. Berberine is present in goldenseal, and activates macrophages (special white blood cells), which are responsible for destruction of bacteria, fungi, viruses and tumour cells.

Boost your immune system
When you are rundown it is a very good idea to boost your immune system so that your body can fight back. An excellent supplement to use in these circumstance is our Goldenseal, Astragalus and Echinacea combination. We also recommend that you take this with the circulation formula which consists of Garlic, Ginger, Cayenne and Ginkgo Biloba.

Taken together you get the individual benefits of each and they compliment each other. The immune formula is assisted by better circulation. And your circulation improvement will be maximised if your immune system is in good shape. You can find further details of these products here –> The Immune and circulation boosting kit. There is also a discount available there if you choose to buy both of them together.

Other suggestions
Herbalists have been using liquorice to soothe chest and throat complaints since the third century BC. It is used in the treatment of asthma, bronchitis, throat problems, colds and coughs. Liquorice contains anti-viral compounds that induce the release of interferon, the bodies own anti-viral constituents. It is an expectorant* and anti-inflammatory making it excellent for stubborn coughs and lung infections. As well as being a soothing herb, liquorice tastes nice! Large doses can act as a laxative.

*expectorant: promoting the secretion, liquefaction or expulsion of sputum (mass or salivary matter ejected from the mouth) from the respiratory passages.

Sage is a traditional remedy of long standing for soothing sore throats as it has antiseptic and anti-bacterial properties. For an inflamed throat and hoarseness use a hot sage infusion or gargle with a sage, apple cider vinegar and honey mix. In feverish conditions, sage is very cooling. Take as a tea or tincture.

Peppermint is a valuable expectorant* in the treatment of bronchitis, colds and flu. It reduces fevers by inducing sweating and cooling the body. It is also a painkiller for headaches and some migraines. It is a soothing decongestant and makes an effective inhalation for clearing blocked sinuses.

Other herbs which will assist in combating and relieving colds are:

Lemon Balm: Lemon Balm tea promotes sweating. This is good for feverish colds as it helps to eliminate the toxins from the body.

Blackberry: More commonly know as Bramble. The fruit is rich in vitamin C. The leaves can be used to make a cleansing tea, or make a poultice from fresh, lightly boiled leaves.

Borage: A versatile herb, borage promotes sweating and has expectorant* properties, both of which are beneficial for feverish, chesty colds.

Catnip: Catnip or Catmint, promotes perspiration and a hot infusion is good for feverish colds and flu’s. Catnip is also a muscle relaxant and mild sedative so will help to induce sleep.

Cinnamon: Will stop vomiting and relieve feelings of nausea. Take as a tea. Cinnamon oil also had anti-bacterial properties.

Fenugreek: Has expectorant qualities. It is anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and soothing. It can ease coughs and sore throats.

Juniper: Steam inhalations of Juniper is beneficial for relieving congestion in coughs and colds. Add a few drops of the oil to hot boiled water, place your face over the bowl, cover with a towel, and inhale the steam.

Lemon: Lemons are a rich source of vitamin c, and taken hot in a hot lemon and honey drink, is a traditional remedy for colds and sore throats.

Yarrow: Yarrow has anti-inflammatory properties, and a hot yarrow tea will promote sweating. Many herbalists consider yarrow to be one of the principle herbal remedies for fever, feverish colds and flu. It is often taken in combination with elderflower and peppermint. Or try adding a strong infusion of yarrow and camomile to a warm bath.


9 Tips to Treat Colds and Flu the ‘Natural’ Way

No. 1: Blow Your Nose Often — and the Right Way
It’s important to blow your nose regularly when you have a cold rather than sniffling mucus back into your head. But when you blow hard, pressure can cause an earache. The best way to blow your nose: Press a finger over one nostril while you blow gently to clear the other. Wash your hands after blowing your nose.

No. 2: Stay Rested
Resting when you first come down with a cold or the flu helps your body direct its energy toward the immune battle. This battle taxes the body. So give it a little help by lying down under a blanket.

No. 3: Gargle
Gargling can moisten a sore throat and bring temporary relief. Try a teaspoon of salt dissolved in warm water, four times daily. To reduce the tickle in your throat, try an astringent gargle — such as tea that contains tannin — to tighten the membranes. Or use a thick, viscous gargle made with honey, popular in folk medicine. Steep one tablespoon of raspberry leaves or lemon juice in two cups of hot water; mix with one teaspoon of honey. Let the mixture cool to room temperature before gargling. Honey should never be given to children less than 1 year old.

No. 4: Drink Hot Liquids
Hot liquids relieve nasal congestion, help prevent dehydration, and can soothe the uncomfortably inflamed membranes that line your nose and throat.

No. 5: Take a Steamy Shower
Steamy showers moisturize your nasal passages and relax you. If you’re dizzy from the flu, run a steamy shower while you sit on a chair nearby and take a sponge bath.

No. 6: Use a Salve Under Your Nose
A small dab of mentholated salve under your nose can open breathing passages and help soothe the irritated skin at the base of the nose. Menthol, eucalyptus and camphor all have mild numbing ingredients that may help relieve the pain of a nose rubbed raw.

No. 7: Apply Hot or Cold Packs Around Your Congested Sinuses
Either temperature may help you feel more comfortable. You can buy reusable hot or cold packs at a drugstore. Or make your own. Take a damp washcloth and heat it for 55 seconds in a microwave (test the temperature first to make sure it’s right for you.) Or take a small bag of frozen peas to use as a cold pack.

No. 8: Sleep With an Extra Pillow Under Your Head
This will help with the drainage of nasal passages. If the angle is too awkward, try placing the pillows between the mattress and the box springs to create a more gradual slope.

No. 9: Don’t Fly Unless Necessary
There’s no point adding stress to your already stressed-out upper respiratory system, and that’s what the change in air pressure will do. Flying with cold or flu congestion can hurt your eardrums as a result of pressure changes during takeoff and landing. If you must fly, use a decongestant and carry a nasal spray with you to use just before takeoff and landing. Chewing gum and swallowing frequently can also help relieve pressure.

Remember, serious conditions can masquerade as the common cold and a mild infection can evolve into something more serious. If you have severe symptoms or are feeling sicker with each passing day, see a doctor.

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